CitEdEV

Database of resources

  • Auld, E., & Morris, P. (2019). Science by streetlight and the OECD‚Äôs measure of global competence: A new yardstick for internationalisation?¬†Policy futures in education,¬†17(6), 677-698.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/1478210318819246
  • Bamber, P., Lewin, D., & White, M. (2018). (Dis-) Locating the transformative dimension of global citizenship education.¬†Journal of curriculum studies,¬†50(2), 204-230.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/00220272.2017.1328077
  • BOSIO, E., TORRES, C. A. (2019). Global citizenship education: An educational theory of the common good? A conversation with Carlos Alberto Torres. Policy Futures in Education ‚Äď SAGE, 17, 745-760.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/1478210319825517
  • Bourn, D. (2021). Global Skills and Global Citizenship Education. In Bosio, E. (2021).¬†Conversations on global citizenship education: perspectives on research, teaching, and learning in higher education. Routledge, p. 75‚Äď88.
  • Brennan, S., & Holliday, E. (2019). Preparing Globally Competent Teachers to Address P-12 Students’ Needs: One University’s Story.¬†Global education review,¬†6(3), 49.
  • Byker, E. J., & Ezelle-thomas, V. (2021). Preparing Teacher Candidates with Global Competencies: Taking Action on the Global Water Crisis with Service Learning.¬†Journal of research in childhood education,¬†35(2), 268-280.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2021.1880996
  • Byker, E. J., & Putman, S. M. (2019). Catalyzing Cultural and Global Competencies.¬†Journal of studies in international education,¬†23(1), 84-105.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/1028315318814559
  • Carter, A. (2020). In Search of the Ideal Tool for International School Teachers to Increase their Global Competency: An Action Research Analysis of the Global Competency Learning Continuum.¬†Journal of research in international education,¬†19(1), 23-37.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/1475240920916045
  • Crawford, E. O., Higgins, H. J., & Hilburn, J. (2020). Using a global competence model in an instructional design course before social studies methods: A developmental approach to global teacher education.¬†Journal of social studies research,¬†44(4), 367-381.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jssr.2020.04.002
  • Engel, L. C., Rutkowski, D., & Thompson, G. (2019). Toward an international measure of global competence? A critical look at the PISA 2018 framework.¬†Globalisation, societies and education,¬†17(2), 117-131.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/14767724.2019.1642183
  • Estell√©s, M., & Fischman, G. E. (2021). Who Needs Global Citizenship Education? A Review of the Literature on Teacher Education.¬†Journal of teacher education,¬†72(2), 223-236.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/0022487120920254
  • European Commission (2023)¬†The EU Values.https://ec.europa.eu/component-library/eu/about/eu-values/
  • HADJICHAMBIS, A. Ch., REIS, P., PARASKEVA-HADJICHAMBI, D., ńĆINńĆERA, J., BOEVE-DE PAUW, J., GERICKE, N., KNIPPELS, M. Ch. Conceptualizing Environmental citizenship for 21st Century Education. 2020. ISBN 9783030202491. 10.1007/978-3-030-20249-1
  • Kerkhoff, S. N., & Cloud, M. E. (2020). Equipping teachers with globally competent practices: A mixed methods study on integrating global competence and teacher education.¬†International journal of educational research,¬†103, 101629-101629.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijer.2020.101629
  • Koh, A., Pashby, K., Tarc, P., & Yemini, M. (2022). Editorial: Internationalisation in teacher education.¬†Teachers and teaching, theory and practice,¬†ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print), 1-14.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/13540602.2022.2119381
  • Kopish, M. A., Shahri, B., & Amira, M. (2019). Developing Globally Competent Teacher Candidates through Cross-Cultural Experiential Learning.¬†Journal of international social studies,¬†9(2), 3.
  • L√≥pez, M. M., & Lara Morales, P. R. (2021). From Global South to Global North: Lessons from a Short-Term Study Abroad Program for Chilean Teacher Candidates in English Pedagogy.¬†Journal of research in childhood education,¬†35(2), 248-267.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2021.1880997
  • Mansilla, V. B., & Chua, F. S. G. (2016). Signature Pedagogies in Global Competence Education: Understanding Quality Teaching Practice. In¬†Signature Pedagogies in Global Competence Education: Understanding Quality Teaching Practice(pp. 93-115). Springer Singapore.¬†https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-1673-8_5
  • MCLEAN, L., COOK, S., CROWE, T. (2008). Imaging Global Citizens: Teaching Peace and Global Education in a Teacher-Education Programme. Citizenship Teaching and Learning, 4, 50-65.¬†https://www.academia.edu/4000666/Imagining_global_citizens_teaching_peace_and_global_education_in_a_teacher_education_programme
  • MONROE, M., PLATE, R., OXARART, A., BOWERS, A. & CHAVES, W. (2019) Identifying effective climate change education strategies: a systematic review of the research. Environmental Education Research, 25, 791-812.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/13504622.2017.1360842
  • Myers, J. P., & Rivero, K. (2019). Preparing globally competent preservice teachers: The development of content knowledge, disciplinary skills, and instructional design.¬†Teaching and teacher education,¬†77, 214-225.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.10.008
  • Nussbaum (2006) Frontiers of Justice. Disability, Nationality, Species Membership, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA: Belknapavailab from¬†https://iai.tv/articles/the-cosmopolitan-tradition-a-noble-but-flawed-ideal-auid-1255, Retrieved 11/10 2023.
  • Reyneke, M. (2011). The right to dignity and restorative justice in schools. Journal of Politics, 14(6): 129-217.¬†http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/pelj.v14i6.5
  • SHULTZ, L., ELFERT, M. Global Citizenship Education in ASPnet Schools: An Ethical Framework for Action. The Canadian Commission for UNESCO‚Äôs IdeaLab, October 2018.¬†https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328488834_Global_Citizenship_Education_in_ASPnet_Schools_An_Ethical_Framework_for_Action_A_Reflection_Paper_prepared_for_the_Canadian_Commission_for_UNESCO
  • SCHIPPLING, A.. Researching global citizenship education: Towards acritical approach. Journal of Social Science EducationVol. 19, No. 4 (2020)DOI 10.4119/jsse-3466pp. 98-113¬†https://www.jsse.org/index.php/jsse/article/view/3466/4001
  • STAR√Ā, Jana a Karel STAR√Ě. Qualitative case study: teaching citizenship through history education in primary schools.¬†Citizenship Teaching & Learning. 2019, 14(1), 87-105. ISSN 1751-1917.¬†https://intellectdiscover.com/content/journals/10.1386/ctl.14.1.87_1
  • Stein, S., & Andreotti, V. (2021). Global citizenship otherwise. In Bosio, E. (2021).¬†Conversations on global citizenship education: perspectives on research, teaching, and learning in higher education. Routledge, p. 13-36.¬†https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429346897-2
  • Stein, S., Andreotti, V., Ahenakew, C., SuŇ°a, R., Valley, W., Huni Kui, N., Trememb√©, M., Taylor, L., Siwek, D., Cardoso, C., Duque, C. ‘A. ‘, Oliveira da Silva Huni Kui, S., Calhoun, B., van Sluys, S., Amsler, S., D’emilia, D., Pigeau, D., Andreotti, B., Bowness, E., et al. (2023). Beyond colonial futurities in climate education.¬†Teaching in higher education,¬†28(5), 987-1004.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2023.2193667
  • Tarozzi, M. (2020). Role of NGOs in Global Citizenship Education, In¬†The Bloomsbury handbook of Global Education and Learning, edited by D. Bourn, 133-148.
  • Tichnor-Wagner, A., Parkhouse, H., Glazier, J., & Cain, J. M. (2019).¬†Becoming a Globally Competent Teacher.
  • UNESCO (2015). Global citizenship education: topics and learning objectives. 978-92-3-100102-4.¬†https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000232993
  • United Nations. Act for our future¬† available from¬†https://www.un.org/en/actnow(accessed on¬†¬† 11/10¬† 2023)
  • United Nations. Sustainable Development Goals available from¬†https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/student-resources(accessed¬† on 11/10¬†¬†2023 )
  • WELPLY, O. Global imaginaries: re-thinking possibilities for GCE. Zeitschrift f√ľr Internationale Bildungsforschung und Entwicklungsp√§dagogik [online]. 2019, 42(4), 27-33 [cit. 2020-11-29]. ISSN 14344688. doi:10.31244/zep.2019.04.05
  • West, J. D., Jacquet, J., King, M. M., Correll, S. J., & Bergstrom, C. T. (2013). The role of gender in scholarly authorship.¬†PloS one,¬†8(7), e66212.¬†https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0066212
  • WOOD, B., TAYLOR, R., ATKINS, R., & JOHNSTON, M. (2018). Pedagogies for active citizenship: Learning through affective and cognitive domains for deeper democratic engagement. Teaching and Teacher Education, 75, 59 ‚Äď 267.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.07.007
  • Yemini, M. (2021). Rethinking the sacred truths of global citizenship education: A theoretical exploration.¬†Prospects (Paris),¬†53(3-4), 173-179. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11125-021-09587-1
  • Yemini, M., Tibbitts, F., & Goren, H. (2019). Trends and caveats: Review of literature on global citizenship education in teacher training.¬†Teaching and teacher education,¬†77, 77-89.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.09.014
  • Auld, E., & Morris, P. (2019). Science by streetlight and the OECD‚Äôs measure of global competence: A new yardstick for internationalisation?¬†Policy futures in education,¬†17(6), 677-698.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/1478210318819246
  • Educational institutions have been among the most active social organisations responding to and facilitating processes associated with globalisation. This has primarily been undertaken through the attempts of schools and universities to ‚Äėinternationalise‚Äô their student intake, staffing, curricula, research, and assessment systems. Amongst the many benefits associated with the promotion of ‚Äėinternationalisation‚Äô is that it will provide students with attributes such as global citizenship, skills or competencies that will contribute to improving tolerance, respect and harmony between nations and cultures. Various nations and global agencies actively promote such goals and global citizenship is included in the United Nations‚Äô Sustainable Development Goals. Positioned as a response to the Sustainable Development Goals, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has developed a metric to compare the ‚Äėglobal competency‚Äô of 15-year-old pupils, which was incorporated into the Programme for International Student Assessment 2018. We analyse the rationales for this decision, the conception of ‚Äėglobal competence‚Äô adopted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and how these have changed since its inception in 2013. We also explore how it will be measured and how the organisation deals with what it describes as ‚Äėthe most salient challenge affecting PISA‚Äô. We argue: (i) the official conception of ‚Äėglobal competence‚Äô finally adopted was strongly influenced by the organisation‚Äôs quest to position itself as the agency responsible for monitoring progress on the Sustainable Development Goals, and then amended to match what could be easily measured; and (ii) although the organisation presents its global competencies using a humanitarian discourse, it is framed by its economic mission.
  • Bamber, P., Lewin, D., & White, M. (2018). (Dis-) Locating the transformative dimension of global citizenship education.¬†Journal of curriculum studies,¬†50(2), 204-230.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/00220272.2017.1328077
  • Despite a groundswell of evidence for transformative education, manifestos for ‚Äėtransformative pedagogy for global citizenship‚Äô remain under-theorized and pay limited attention to implications for practice. This paper connects theory and practice through analyzing a curriculum development project that sought to produce a framework for ‚Äėengaged global citizens‚Äô. It considers the political and philosophical framings of the self and other, citizen and world, that underlie this empirical work, especially with reference to reflexivity, hermeneutics, democratic engagement and co-production. The resultant pedagogical framework, based upon concepts of transformative learning, attempted to undercut the homogenizing tendencies within global citizenship education (GCE). This discussion highlights the tensions and reifying effects of educational frameworks such as the Teaching Excellence Framework in the UK and the proposed framework for ‚Äėglobal competence‚Äô in the 2018 Programme for International Student Assessment. Evidence is presented that frameworks which attempt to make explicit educational phenomena and processes are overdetermined by efficacy and metrics that become perverse ends in themselves. While the anticipated project output here was the framework itself, the substantive output was, in fact, practical: namely the ongoing deliberation and reflection upon the discourses that both do and undo the task of locating the transformative dimension of GCE.
  • BOSIO, E., TORRES, C. A. (2019). Global citizenship education: An educational theory of the common good? A conversation with Carlos Alberto Torres. Policy Futures in Education ‚Äď SAGE, 17, 745-760.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/1478210319825517
  • This paper presents a remarkable conversation with Carlos Alberto Torres about Global Citizenship Education (GCE) in relation to research, teaching, and learning in the USA. Torres is a Distinguished Professor of Education, UNESCO UCLA Chair on Global Learning and Global Citizenship Education, UCLA and Founding Director of the Paulo Freire Institute (S√£o Paulo; Buenos Aires; UCLA). In this dialogue, he artfully blends together theoretical and practical perspectives on global citizenship focused on the connection between culture and power, the interrelationships of economic, political and cultural spheres in the modern educational institutions in the context of growing internationalization and globalization of education offering an exclusive portrait of GCE as a site of permanent pursuit for social justice. Our t√™te-√†-t√™te is presented as a pedagogical tool for discussion that invites educators to reflect critically on the possible origins and implications of GCE discourses they are exposed to. It is designed with the intent to contribute toward the possibility of imagining a ‚Äúyet-to-come‚ÄĚ post-colonial, critical-transformative, and value-creating GCE-curriculum beyond a Westernized, market-oriented and apolitical practices toward a more sustainable paradigm based on principles of mutuality and reciprocity, or as Torres calls it in this discussion ‚Äúel buen vivir‚ÄĚ‚ÄĒa concept that portrays a way of acting in society that is community-centric, ecologically balanced, and culturally sensitive, in the ongoing construction of a more just and peaceful world.
  • Bourn, D. (2021). Global Skills and Global Citizenship Education. In Bosio, E. (2021).¬†Conversations on global citizenship education: perspectives on research, teaching, and learning in higher education. Routledge, p. 75‚Äď88.
  • This chapter discusses the Global Skills’ framework in terms of its relevance and importance for the training and skills development of a range of professions. It outlines why to see such a term as more appropriate than 21st century skills. Reference and discussion are made to how these ideas on global skills have become a feature of his teaching at University College London, Institute of Education within the distance learning masters’ program he leads on Development Education and Global Learning. Finally, the author examines the need for universities in their teaching and learning to move beyond the rhetoric of global citizenship and to bring in a closer and more direct skills element into the learning. But these need to be in a form that encourages looking at issues from different worldviews, reflecting critically on own’s perspectives and approaches and equipping the learner with the skills to actively engage in society and address the current injustices that exist in the world.
  • Brennan, S., & Holliday, E. (2019). Preparing Globally Competent Teachers to Address P-12 Students’ Needs: One University’s Story.¬†Global education review,¬†6(3), 49.
  • In this article, two teacher educators share the evolution of an Overseas Student Teaching (OST) program embedded in the University of Kentucky‚Äôs Educator Preparation Program (EPP). The goal of this initiative is to help candidates who participate in this program develop skills associated with global competence so they can better address the needs of P-12 students from a wide range of diverse backgrounds when they enter the profession. We begin with a rationale explaining the importance of global competence for teachers as seen through a policy and theoretical lens. We also identify possible obstacles involved in initiatives such as ours and offer suggestions about how to overcome them. Then, we describe the curriculum OST participants follow including key assignments and tools used to guide and assess their progress. We conclude with expansion plans designed to help more teacher candidates in our EPP become globally competent teachers whether or not they participate in the overseas initiative.
  • Byker, E. J., & Ezelle-thomas, V. (2021). Preparing Teacher Candidates with Global Competencies: Taking Action on the Global Water Crisis with Service Learning.¬†Journal of research in childhood education,¬†35(2), 268-280.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2021.1880996
  • Clean water is a basic necessity for sustaining life. Not only important for drinking, water is also necessary for good health and sanitation. The United Nations emphasizes the need for clean water in their Sustainable Development Goal 6, which seeks to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all people of the world by 2030. Despite the global attention related to accessing clean water, many future educators are not aware of issues related to Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (i.e., WASH) nor are they aware of the extent of the global water crisis. It is imperative that teacher education helps prepare teacher candidates to become globally competent as well as equipped to guide classroom students into taking action on WASH-related issues, including the global water crisis. The aim of this article is to describe and report on a case study of the implementation of a global service-learning project with teacher candidates. The case study is situated at a regional, teaching-focused university located in the southcentral region of the United States (n¬†= 49). Our study examines teacher candidates‚Äô perceptions of the service-learning project in relation to developing global competencies like ‚ÄúInvestigating the World‚ÄĚ and ‚ÄúTaking Action‚ÄĚ about WASH issues.
  • Byker, E. J., & Putman, S. M. (2019). Catalyzing Cultural and Global Competencies.¬†Journal of studies in international education,¬†23(1), 84-105.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/1028315318814559
  • Study abroad is an experiential learning pedagogy that has many positive outcomes. In the field of teacher education, study abroad provides opportunity for the development of global competencies and agency. Similarly, study abroad can help expand notions of what it means to be a global citizen. This article examines the effects of preservice teachers engaging in a study abroad program to South Africa. Critical Cosmopolitan Theory provides the article‚Äôs theoretical frame for the investigation of the impact of this study abroad program. The study‚Äôs participant sample comprised preservice teachers from a large research university located in the Southeast region of the United States (N= 21). Using a mixed-methods research design, the study examined the participants‚Äô perceptions of their study abroad and international teaching experiences. It was found that the study abroad experience was a catalyst for enhancing preservice teachers‚Äô global competencies, intercultural awareness, and cultural responsiveness as the participants widened their perspectives of what it means to be a critically cosmopolitan educator and citizen.
  • Carter, A. (2020). In Search of the Ideal Tool for International School Teachers to Increase their Global Competency: An Action Research Analysis of the Global Competency Learning Continuum.¬†Journal of research in international education,¬†19(1), 23-37.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/1475240920916045
  • It is clear that if international school teachers are to be able to properly prepare students for a 21st century globalized workplace, they must first develop the global competence and intercultural skills needed to implement their students‚Äô development of global knowledge, skills and attitudes. Unfortunately, in many public schools and international schools, teachers do not possess the global competency needed to do so effectively. Since it can be expensive and ambitious to instill global competency in teachers on a school-wide, district-wide or nation-wide level, it may be more feasible for individual teachers to address their global competency deficit and take the necessary steps to improve it. There are several tools that can be used by individual teachers seeking to improve the awareness, skills and dispositions needed to become a truly globally competent teacher.
  • This study focused on an innovative new tool, the Global Competency Learning Continuum (GCLC), which was designed for teachers and offers a resource library to help teachers address their shortcomings in twelve different levels of global competency. The research sought to ascertain whether the Global Competency Learning Continuum is an appropriate tool for international school teachers to use to assess and improve their global competency ‚Äď or if there is a demand for an entirely new instrument that is more applicable to international school teachers. After reviewing research from surveys of international teachers, the data indicates that the Global Competency Learning Continuum is a promising and effective tool for use by international school teachers. It is the only tool designed specifically for teachers by a highly-respected educational institution, is free of charge and offers a valuable trove of resources for teachers who wish to actively improve their global competency.
  • Crawford, E. O., Higgins, H. J., & Hilburn, J. (2020). Using a global competence model in an instructional design course before social studies methods: A developmental approach to global teacher education.¬†Journal of social studies research,¬†44(4), 367-381.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jssr.2020.04.002
  • This case study describes the design, learning experiences, and student outcomes in one Instructional Design course with an explicit focus on globally competent teaching. We make the argument that forefronting global competence in an Instructional Design course, prior to social studies methods, is a necessary precursor to accelerate students‚Äô progress on a pathway towards teaching for global competence. In support of this argument, we (a) describe the ways in which an Instructional Design course in one university forefronted global competence; (b) explain the short- and long-term outcomes of this design; and (c) highlight four students to illustrate how the Instructional Design course helped to move students along a pathway towards global competence. We nest our approach within a globally competent teaching framework.
  • Engel, L. C., Rutkowski, D., & Thompson, G. (2019). Toward an international measure of global competence? A critical look at the PISA 2018 framework.¬†Globalisation, societies and education,¬†17(2), 117-131.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/14767724.2019.1642183
  • This paper focuses on the OECD‚Äôs PISA 2018 international framework for global competence. Given the growing national and international attention on educating for global competence, and absent of other measures, there is a need to scrutinise this framework. Our critical analysis is conceptually framed by academic literature related to (a) the OECD‚Äôs influential role in facilitating neoliberal education policy trends, (b) disjuncture and debate surrounding global competence, and (c) how influence is garnered through measurement technologies. We conclude by encouraging the OECD to be transparent in the reporting of results and educational stakeholders to be cautious interpreters of forthcoming results and rankings.
  • Estell√©s, M., & Fischman, G. E. (2021). Who Needs Global Citizenship Education? A Review of the Literature on Teacher Education.¬†Journal of teacher education,¬†72(2), 223-236.¬†https://doi.org/10.1177/0022487120920254
  • Given the seemingly ever-increasing scholarly production about the ideas and ideals of global citizenship education (GCE), it is not surprising those discussions started to gain influence in teacher education (TE) debates. In this study, we examine the discourses that tacitly shape the meanings of GCE within the contemporary academic literature on TE. After analyzing the peer-reviewed scholarship published from 2003 to 2018, we identified patterns in how GCE for TE was described and defended, beyond the differences in their conceptual frameworks. The dominant trend found is to frame GCE as a redemptive educational solution to global problems. This framing requires teachers to embrace a redemptive narrative following a model of rationality based on altruistic, hyperrationalized and overly romanticized ideals. Ultimately, TE literature contributes to the configuration of an excessively na√Įve discourse that tends to ignore the neoliberal context in which both GCE and TE take place today.
  • European Commission (2023)¬†The EU Values.https://ec.europa.eu/component-library/eu/about/eu-values/
  • HADJICHAMBIS, A. Ch., REIS, P., PARASKEVA-HADJICHAMBI, D., ńĆINńĆERA, J., BOEVE-DE PAUW, J., GERICKE, N., KNIPPELS, M. Ch. Conceptualizing Environmental citizenship for 21st Century Education. 2020. ISBN 9783030202491. 10.1007/978-3-030-20249-1
  • This Open Access book is about the development of a common understanding of environmental citizenship. It conceptualizes and frames environmental citizenship taking an educational perspective. Organized in four complementary parts, the book first explains the political, economic and societal dimensions of the concept. Next, it examines environmental citizenship as a psychological concept with a specific focus on knowledge, values, beliefs and attitudes. It then explores environmental citizenship within the context of environmental education and education for sustainability. It elaborates responsible environmental behaviour, youth activism and education for sustainability through the lens of environmental citizenship. Finally, it discusses the concept within the context of different educational levels, such as primary and secondary education in formal and non-formal settings.
  • Environmental citizenship is a key factor in sustainability, green and cycle economy, and low-carbon society, and an important aspect in addressing global environmental problems. It has been an influential concept in many different arenas such as economy, policy, philosophy, and organizational marketing. In the field of education, the concept could be better exploited and established, however. Education and, especially, environmental discourses in science education have a great deal to contribute to the adoption and promotion of environmental citizenship.
  • Kerkhoff, S. N., & Cloud, M. E. (2020). Equipping teachers with globally competent practices: A mixed methods study on integrating global competence and teacher education.¬†International journal of educational research,¬†103, 101629-101629.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijer.2020.101629
  • Education leaders recommend that global competence‚Äďglobal citizenship mentality and knowledge development for global participation‚Äďbe incorporated into school curricula. This mixed methods study examined teacher‚Äôs perceptions and self-reported practices of globally competent teaching. Data was collected from teachers taking a graduate education course infused with global learning. Results suggest teachers value and desire to enact globally competent teaching but need practical direction for classroom effectuation. Data manifest all four dimensions of the Global Teaching Model (i.e., situated relevant practice, integrated global learning, critical and cultural consciousness raising, and intercultural collaboration for transformative action) to differing degrees. This study provides evidence for the Global Teaching Model as a prospective framework and emphasizes the critical dimension when internationalizing teacher education.
  • Koh, A., Pashby, K., Tarc, P., & Yemini, M. (2022). Editorial: Internationalisation in teacher education.¬†Teachers and teaching, theory and practice,¬†ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print), 1-14.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/13540602.2022.2119381
  • In this special issue, we have examined internationalisation processes in teacher education in multiple contexts dealing with questions of organisational structures, of identity, of inequality, of teaching and learning and of the value of ITE despite challenges and tensions. While the preoccupation with the internationalisation process has not diminished in its intensity in recent decades, the future of the field must be considered critically. One vital task, which has motivated our special issue, is to illuminate actual (and possible) forms of ITE, to consider limits and possibilities, in the hopes that greater understandings will inform how internationalisation can be enacted and steered in the domain of teacher education.
  • Of course, this task is no easy one, since ITE remains a complex phenomenon that can be examined from many angles. It is also constantly evolving and changing both in the light of the world‚Äôs coping with the COVID pandemic and as a result of economic, political and social processes shaping schooling across diverse contexts globally and locally. ITE has similar features to internationalisation in higher education in general, but it also has unique characteristics due to the localness of the teaching profession, and the tighter control of nation-states over the curriculum and training methods. Further,¬†teachereducation is¬†inter-generationally¬†implicated in, by way of teachers‚Äô responsibility for children‚Äôs and youth‚Äôs learning and becoming, the upcoming generations‚Äô participation in the world.
  • Finally, we anticipate three important directions of development for ITE futures. The first is on internationalisation that does not involve physical mobility. Internationalisation ‚Äėat home‚Äô was much talked about even before the COVID pandemic. With the increasing pressure of environmental movements against air travel, alongside technological developments in teaching and learning, we are likely to continue to explore the most appropriate ways to implement this process in institutions. For example, research could explore the use of communications technologies as the vehicle to connect TE in different countries so as to reduce carbon food print. While digital footprints are not neutral, new media technologies and platforms can be used to connect teacher educators and to collaborate on ITE curricular and pedagogy as Tarc and Budrow suggest.
  • Second, the process of internationalisation in teacher education should be examined in the light of nationalist and inward convergence trends of political systems in many countries that impact education (examples of these processes include right-wing government elections in Eastern European countries, Brexit and more). We suggest further research could explore cosmopolitanising the ‚Äėinternational‚Äô in ITE, given how the national (and sometimes nationalism) mediates the international (as Bamberger and Yemini show). While national and local educational jurisdictions will maintain a level of control over education, how can teacher education foster critically reflexive cosmpolitan values, commitments and ethics and build transnational human solidarities?
  • A third direction of prospective development, is the impact of ITE on PSP and the students they (will) teach. It seems that many of the training tracks are localised, in the sense that the training is carried out in the schools by the school staffs. It will be interesting to see how processes of ITE may take place within k-12 schools and intersect with preservice ITE. We suggest that longtitudinal studies be conducted in the form of tracking graduates of preservice ITE programmes as they enter schools and carry the international/global education torch in their early years as k-12 teachers. Such longitudinal studies could inquire into and consider how in-service PD for teachers might augment preservice ITE, as Engel and Gonzalez illustrate, with greater access to mobility opportunities as a key element. Finally, we hope our special issue will be a source of inspiration that will spur more vibrant research and conversations on ITE even as many global uncertainties lie ahead of us¬†neverthess.
  • Kopish, M. A., Shahri, B., & Amira, M. (2019). Developing Globally Competent Teacher Candidates through Cross-Cultural Experiential Learning.¬†Journal of international social studies,¬†9(2), 3.
  • An emerging imperative for teacher preparation programs is the development of globally competent teacher candidates. Employing a convergent parallel mixed methods design, the researchers analyzed data from Asia Society‚Äôs Global Competencies (2008) survey, critical reflection journals, course assignments, and field notes of 124 undergraduate teacher candidates enrolled in two teacher preparation courses during three academic years. Findings demonstrate candidates‚Äô perceptions of learning experiences and the extent to which the experiences contributed to the development of global competencies. For educators, the study provides examples of cross-cultural experiential learning that contribute to the development of globally competent teacher candidates.
  • L√≥pez, M. M., & Lara Morales, P. R. (2021). From Global South to Global North: Lessons from a Short-Term Study Abroad Program for Chilean Teacher Candidates in English Pedagogy.¬†Journal of research in childhood education,¬†35(2), 248-267.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2021.1880997
  • In this qualitative study of a short-term study abroad program from Chile to the United States, teacher candidates in English pedagogy reported developing globally competent teacher attributes. Through the experiences in the program, the Chilean teacher candidates reported that their international perspectives were enhanced, their repertoire of teaching strategies and skills was broadened, and they felt more equipped to work effectively with multilingual students in their own contexts. There were also challenges related to their own cross cultural learning and English language proficiency. While most research has followed university students from the Global North traveling to another locale, this study is unique in that the participants were from Chile studying in the United States. The impacts of colonialism and anti-colonialism were explored that related not only to the institutional structures and geopolitical frameworks of the disparate regions but also educators‚Äô thinking. Thus, to be globally competent in Chile may encompass different attributes than being globally competent in the United States.
  • Mansilla, V. B., & Chua, F. S. G. (2016). Signature Pedagogies in Global Competence Education: Understanding Quality Teaching Practice. In¬†Signature Pedagogies in Global Competence Education: Understanding Quality Teaching Practice(pp. 93-115). Springer Singapore.¬†https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-1673-8_5
  • How might we support young people to understand who they are in an interconnected world, prepare them to consider multiple perspectives as they collaborate with others across cultures and languages to improve conditions, and provide opportunities for them to participate positively in civic life, school, and work? Preparing students for today‚Äôs world requires not only that we think about what matters most for students to learn, but also what kind of teaching and learning will prove most effective. Building on Lee Shulman‚Äôs idea of¬†signature pedagogies, we propose a pedagogical approach uniquely tailored to nurturing deep, relevant, and compelling global learning and a concomitant framework for developing teacher expertise. We define signature pedagogiesin global education as a pervasive set of teaching practices that nurture students‚Äô capacity and disposition to understand and act on matters of global significance. Signature pedagogies organize learners‚Äô experience to inculcate in them hallmark global competence habits of mind: investigating the world, taking perspective, communicating across difference, and taking action. They offer students ample opportunities to engage in ‚Äújunior versions‚ÄĚ of authentic practices in relevant fields, and represent instructional tropes, paths, or motifs. Using illustrative cases at the elementary school level, we describe two types of signature pedagogies in global education:¬†research expedition¬†and¬†purposeful comparisons. Research expedition¬†pedagogy focuses on learner‚Äôs understanding and experience of a distant place ‚Äď geo-physical and environmental qualities, built and natural landscapes, people and social organizations, as well as manifestations of culture in the form of taste, values, practice, relationships and beliefs ‚Äď and helps them develop a sense of personal connection to it.¬†Purposeful comparisons¬†pedagogy builds on the premise that an individual can understand the world by examining a single phenomenon across multiple locations through the lens of a question that makes cross-case analysis necessary. It often involves creating a model or a frame that helps us distil relevant aspects of each case, identifying similarities and differences to inform our understanding. When such signature pedagogies are designed to be a regular part of the learning experience, they nurture understanding of the world and key global dispositions in learners.
  • MCLEAN, L., COOK, S., CROWE, T. (2008). Imaging Global Citizens: Teaching Peace and Global Education in a Teacher-Education Programme. Citizenship Teaching and Learning, 4, 50-65.¬†https://www.academia.edu/4000666/Imagining_global_citizens_teaching_peace_and_global_education_in_a_teacher_education_programme
  • This paper analyzes one teacher-education programme‚Äôs attempt tostructure a year-long immersion in curricula, activities, readings and discussions to¬†promote¬†the¬†effective¬†teaching¬†of¬†peace¬†and¬†global¬†education.¬†This¬†multi-faceted¬†initiative is provided for teacher candidates at all levels, from those intending toteach kindergarten to the last year of high school. Now in its fifth year of operation,¬†Developing¬†a¬†Global¬†Perspective¬†for¬†Educators/D√©veloppement¬†d‚Äôune¬†perspectiveglobale pour enseignants et enseignantes has expanded the type of learningopportunities annually.The increasing success in drawing candidates from the anglophone and, to a lesser¬†extent, francophone teacher-education sectors, graduate students and members of¬†the teaching community to the varied presentations has led committee members toexplore why students eagerly attend the functions, engage in discussions, endorsethe ready-made curricula materials and, at the¬†same time, remain reticent as to¬†their¬†abilities and opportunities to teach what they have learned and endorsed. Our¬†observations of the latter phenomenon has led the authors in this study to explorethe barriers that prevent peace and global education from being taught inclassrooms. Based on our research, we argue that success for the pre-servicecandidate in teaching such topics is influenced by gender, disciplinary knowledgeand pedagogical skill. The study addresses which of these barriers can be overcomethrough our efforts as instructors in a Faculty of Education to more effectively insert¬†¬†peace¬†and¬†global¬†education¬†into¬†the¬†mainstream¬†curriculum,¬†with¬†the¬†expectationthat these themes will find¬†their way into the school¬†curriculum.
  • MONROE, M., PLATE, R., OXARART, A., BOWERS, A. & CHAVES, W. (2019) Identifying effective climate change education strategies: a systematic review of the research. Environmental Education Research, 25, 791-812.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/13504622.2017.1360842
  • Increased interest in climate change education and the growing recognition of the challenges inherent to addressing this issue create an opportunity to conduct a systematic review to understand what research can contribute to our ideas about effective climate change education. An academic database, EBSCOhost, was used to identify 959 unique citation records addressing climate change education. Of these, 49 sources met the criteria of focusing on assessment of climate change education interventions. Analysis of these sources examined the intervention purpose, assessment methodology, and identified strategies that might result in effective interventions. Two themes were identified that are common to most environmental education: (1) focusing on personally relevant and meaningful information and (2) using active and engaging teaching methods. Four themes specific to issues such as climate change were also generated: (1) engaging in deliberative discussions, (2) interacting with scientists, (3) addressing misconceptions, and (4) implementing school or community projects. Suggestions for addressing controversial topics like climate change are offered.
  • Myers, J. P., & Rivero, K. (2019). Preparing globally competent preservice teachers: The development of content knowledge, disciplinary skills, and instructional design.¬†Teaching and teacher education,¬†77, 214-225.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.10.008
  • Although current reform efforts responding to the impact of globalization have called on teachers to help youth understand the complexities and challenges of the modern world (Myers, 2016; National Education Association, 2010; UNESCO, 2014; United States Department of Education, 2012; White, & Myers, 2016), most teacher education programs across the world still do not provide preservice teachers (PSTs) with the knowledge and real-world skills for teaching in a global age (Kissock & Richardson, 2010; Shaklee & Baily, 2012). Part of the broader trend toward internationalization in higher education, these reform efforts suggest that PSTs should learn to recognize emerging forms of new knowledge, the challenges of solving global issues, and skills for acting on issues of global consequence (Baildon & Alviar-Martin, 2018; Yemini et¬†al., 2017; Zhao, 2010). A significant finding of this scholarship is that globalization presents a challenge to teaching real-world strategies because it is difficult for teachers to keep up with the rapid pace in which knowledge is produced about the world (Johnson, Boyer, & Brown, 2011). Despite isolated international efforts to prepare cohorts of PSTs for this challenge (Gaudelli, 2016; Larson & Brown, 2017) and to identify the practices that underpin teaching global education (Kerkhoff, 2017; Tichnor-Wagner, Parkhouse, Glazier, & Montana Cain, 2016; Zong, 2009), teachers tend to enter the profession lacking knowledge and disciplinary understanding of global issues, such as globalization, as well as the means to address these issues in teaching practices.
  • Presently, there is a lack of research on practices to bridge this gap between reform calls for a global dimension to teacher preparation and the realities of teacher education programs. This study focuses on learning to teach with simulations in a social studies teacher preparation course. Simulations have long been held up as a best practice in social studies for teaching real-world problems that fosters deep content and conceptual knowledge (Lay & Smarick, 2006; Parker et¬†al., 2011) as well as disciplinary skills (Niv-Solomon et¬†al., 2011; Torney-Purta, 1998). More recently, simulations have been studied for their impact on the competencies needed for global citizenship (Bachen, Hern√°ndez-Ramos, & Raphael, 2012; Myers, 2012). However, simulations are difficult to implement and are rarely seen in social studies classrooms (Dack, van Hover, & Hicks, 2016). This study addresses the persistent challenge in teacher education aligned with global citizenship education to implement challenging teaching practices while providing learning opportunities that convey specialized content knowledge and social science skills.
  • The purpose of this study is to analyze the professional learning for teaching global issues of one cohort (N‚ÄĮ=‚ÄĮ24) of social studies PSTs’ during a web-based simulation of economic globalization, in terms of content knowledge, disciplinary skills, and instructional practices. Our goal was to shed light on the potential educational benefits of simulations for connecting content and pedagogy in teacher education by documenting PSTs’ thinking and experiences. Classroom activities were designed to support learning knowledge of globalization, understanding the disciplinary skill of negotiation, and applying this learning to design an authentic simulation. We used the simulation as a form of representation in which instruction was modeled while PSTs experienced the strategy in the role of students, followed by guided reflection on their experience. Designing a simulation requires PSTs to consider the reciprocal relationship of pedagogy, knowledge of global issues, and disciplinary skills while their prior beliefs about the curriculum and teaching are challenged (Glasgow, 2014).
  • Two research questions guide this study. First, can an online international relations simulation help to prepare PSTs to teach contemporary global issues? In particular, we are interested in how a simulation may support their professional learning of unfamiliar content knowledge and disciplinary skills. Second, does participation in an online simulation support PSTs’ instructional practice for designing a simulation?
  • Despite their promise, simulations have not been widely adopted in teacher education programs. Simulations in teacher education typically involve re-creating virtual classrooms to allow PSTs to experience classroom dynamics and to experiment with teaching practices that can be monitored, adjusted, and repeated (Dieker, Rodriguez, Lignugaris/Kraft, Hynes, & Hughes, 2014). Simulations are also used to learn how to handle ethical issues in teaching (Shapira-Lishchinsky, 2013). These practices are increasingly used to supplement, or sometimes replace, field-based experiences in teacher education programs (Kaufman & Ireland, 2016). These simulations populate virtual classrooms with a teacher and student avatars that can be either controlled by real people or by the computer. Simulation programs such as Second Life (http://secondlife.com), TLE Teachlive (http://teachlive.org), Simschool (http://www.simschool.org), and the Cook School District simulation (http://cook.wou.edu) are popular simulations that focus on the development of instructional decision-making and classroom management.
  • In contrast, discipline-based simulations support the development of specialized knowledge and skills situated within the confines of an academic discipline. The goal is to develop subject area knowledge not learned elsewhere and an understanding of the ways that such knowledge can support teaching. The effectiveness of a discipline-based simulation rests on its fidelity in approximating a real-world situation that requires the knowledge and skills of a particular discipline to solve. Following the successful blueprint of the Model United Nations program, simulations of global events concentrated in the fields of politics, international relations, and world history have been particularly popular and widely used by instructors at the secondary and university levels.
  • Although drawing on a diverse mix of theories and methodologies from other fields, scholars in the field consider international relations as a distinct discipline focused on the interactions of world political actors including non-state actors and closely concerned with global issues such as globalization, the environment, poverty, inequality and human rights (Baylis, Smith, & Owens, 2017). Presently, much of the internal debate focuses on the construction of theory and the shift away from Eurocentric approaches. Negotiation is a significant disciplinary skill central to political decision making at local, national, and global levels. Yet negotiation takes on an increasingly central role at the international level where it is the last line in determining war or peace among nations (Starkey, Boyer, & Wilkenfeld, 2015).
  • International relations simulations are a powerful strategy for teaching knowledge and skills relevant to understanding global issues that may otherwise be ignored in the classroom. These include competencies fundamental to the development of global citizenship, such as analyzing complex problems across political boundaries, working collaboratively to identify solutions to problems, negotiating across differences to resolve controversial issues, and identifying multiple perspectives (Myers, 2012). Limited research also indicates that simulations can support learning disciplinary skills, such as perspective taking and diplomatic negotiation (Cuhadar & Kampf, 2014; Johnson et¬†al., 2011). Negotiation, in particular, is considered a skill of vital importance in the field of international relations because it ‚Äúis the principal means for conflict resolution and international‚ÄĚ and ‚Äúoften the only thing standing between war and peace among states‚ÄĚ (Niv-Solomon et¬†al., 2011, p. 717). Strategies for negotiation typically fall into two main camps, collaborative and competitive, each with a range of tactics and styles (Starkey et¬†al., 2015). In collaborative negotiation, both sides work to identify common interests that would allow both sides to achieve their objectives. On the other hand, a competitive strategy involves conflict over interests with another group, such as with adversarial communication of threats, coercion, or making demands. The implementation of these strategies is complex and depends on a range of factors, including the ability to identify common interests, the stage of the negotiation, and the issue at stake.
  • Educators often use the term simulation interchangeably to include a range of experiential strategies, such as games and role-plays. These strategies share a number of features, including the performance of character roles and the use of realistic scenarios (Wright-Maley, 2015). Games, which have become increasingly popular and varied in recent years, are typically based on competition that produces winners and losers. Games also differ in having invented rules that typically guide participants progressively toward a programmed outcome or predetermined sequence of events. In this respect, games are ‚Äúa fictitious activity without reference to reality ‚Ķ that escapes the usual standards which apply to reality‚ÄĚ (Sauv√©, Renaud, Kaufman, & Jean-Simon, 2007, p. 250), which as a result, do not reflect a real-world system. These distinctions are not hard and fast, however, as some activities such as avatar-based online game environments often have characteristics of both simulations and games.
  • The scholarship points to three main characteristics that make simulation a valuable learning experience and distinguish it from other experiential strategies: (1) creates a synthetic reality of a real-world system; (2) aims to solve a real-world problem; and (3) affords student decision-making within the problem space.
  • Synthetic reality. Simulations faithfully re-create a modified version of a real-world system as ‚Äúevolving case studies of a particular social or physical reality‚ÄĚ (Gredler, 2004, p. 573) that helps learners participating in the activity to acquire a skill and increase knowledge in a particular discipline (Presnilla-Espada, 2014). In this sense, simulations must maintain the dominant characteristics of the particular system that is being replicated. Alternatively, the recreation of reality must also be sufficiently coherent to allow participants to make meaning from the activity without being confused by an overly complex representation of reality (Wright-Maley, 2015). Therefore, while simulations must recreate a real-world system, they do not involve reality in order to provide a safe environment where students can learn from their actions without risking actual consequences or obscuring its educational purpose.
  • Problem-based. Students take on roles that are tasked with achieving a concrete purpose or solve a problem (as opposed to the goal of competing at scoring points to win a game). The goal of a simulation, then, is not to win but to work collaboratively to solve complex and open-ended problems that lack clearly defined answers. According to (Badiee and Kaufman, 2015, p. 2), ‚Äúsimulations are distinguished from games in that they do not involve explicit competition; instead of trying to win, simulation participants take on roles, try out actions, see the results, and try new actions.‚ÄĚ
  • Student agency. During a simulation, participants must also have some decision-making power to exercise within the real-world situation as they try to solve an open-ended problem. Simulations are dynamic systems that are shaped by the decisions and actions of individuals: ‚ÄúAny effective simulation places learners in real situations in which they can act and make decisions with the aim of obtaining real-time feedback‚ÄĚ (Sauv√© et¬†al., 2007, p. 251). Participants must have the ability to manipulate the reality that they are studying by the decisions and choices they make. In contrast, role-plays provide participants with scripted characters to act out in a predetermined skit.
  • The International Communication and Negotiation Simulation (ICONS) (https://www.icons.umd.edu) is an online simulation platform focusing on international relations and diplomatic negotiation of contemporary issues. Each simulation is based on real-world controversies that put students in the role of diplomats and leaders tasked with resolving a significant problem by enacting real-world negotiation between international organizations, government representatives, non-governmental organizations, and local civil society groups. The negotiation uses an online messaging system that allows students to send private communications to other groups. Each group is provided with background information on the scenario, a role sheet, procedures, and a description of the issue.
  • The scenario involved in this research, ‚ÄúGlobalization and Nigerian Oil,‚ÄĚ examines the way that globalization has affected the social, political and economic institutions of developing nations, using the real-life conflict over oil in Nigeria during the 1990s. Globalization is a challenging and complex topic to learn due to its impact on economic, political, and social systems and the existence of various popular misconceptions in circulation (Myers, 2010a). The Nigerian oil case highlights economic issues stemming from the domestic turmoil over the distribution of resources and foreign influence in the Nigerian oil industry. The simulation replicates one aspect of the international political system in which intergovernmental organizations mediate political bargaining to resolve disputes or initiate conflict resolution to maintain peace and human rights. The involvement of a range of international and domestic actors focuses on the way that economic globalization has intensified competition and conflict over markets for natural resources. The negotiation occurs as a United Nations sponsored conference to deliberate a ‚ÄúMemorandum of Understanding‚ÄĚ on security, investment, human rights, and political participation. The eight group roles present conflicting interests and goals in the scenario. The four domestic roles are: (1) the Nigerian government, (2) the Nigerian military, (3) the indigenous Ogoni people, and (4) the Coalition of Women’s Groups. There are also four international organization roles: (5) Shell Oil, (6) the International Monetary Fund (IMF), (7) Human Rights Watch, and (8) Greenpeace.
  • The Nigerian oil simulation includes several features that approximate a real diplomatic negotiation. The scenario requires participants to negotiate an open-ended problem that has multiple outcomes, including the failure to find a resolution. Because the roles are balanced with conflicting interests, it is expected that the groups will work collaboratively to reach a solution to the conflict (Williams & Williams, 2011). This feature fosters student agency by allowing for groups to try out a variety of negotiation styles and to decide with whom they form alliances. Each group can make a variety of decisions that are unscripted and react to the current state of negotiation. However, the scenario limits voting privileges for the proposal to the five groups with a direct stake in the outcome: the internal Nigerian groups (the government, military, Ogoni people, and the Coalition of Women’s Groups) and Shell Oil. Consequently, the non-voting groups may adopt more aggressive, competitive negotiating strategies in order to influence the outcome. All teams have the option to use prepared real-world developments, such as the publishing of emergency reports on the situation or the deployment of troops, which are sent to all groups in the form of public news reports. Lastly, any group can submit a solution proposal and seek support for it. Pre-programmed choices are selected to create proposals, which address the issues of security and economics, such as the removal of military forces or the pledging of funds in infrastructure investment. There is also an option for participants to write in proposal conditions.
  • Nussbaum (2006) Frontiers of Justice. Disability, Nationality, Species Membership, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA: Belknapavailab from¬†https://iai.tv/articles/the-cosmopolitan-tradition-a-noble-but-flawed-ideal-auid-1255, Retrieved 11/10 2023.
  • Reyneke, M. (2011). The right to dignity and restorative justice in schools. Journal of Politics, 14(6): 129-217.¬†http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/pelj.v14i6.5
  • A retributive and punitive approach is normally adopted in dealing with misbehaviour in South African schools. Despite the legal abolition of corporal punishment, more than 50 percent of schools still administer it. Other forms of punishment generally applied are also punitive in nature. The right to dignity of all of the parties affected by misbehaviour in schools is considered in this analysis. The possibility of adopting restorative justice as an alternative disciplinary approach is examined as a way of protecting, promoting and restoring the dignity of the victims of such misbehaviour.
  • SHULTZ, L., ELFERT, M. Global Citizenship Education in ASPnet Schools: An Ethical Framework for Action. The Canadian Commission for UNESCO‚Äôs IdeaLab, October 2018.¬†https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328488834_Global_Citizenship_Education_in_ASPnet_Schools_An_Ethical_Framework_for_Action_A_Reflection_Paper_prepared_for_the_Canadian_Commission_for_UNESCO
  • This report offers teachers and schools an ethical framework to practice global citizenship, based on conviviality and the ‚Äúwhole-school approach‚ÄĚ. Written for the UNESCO Associated Schools network (AspNet schools), the report includes a short section on the history of global citizenship education and UNESCO; a section on global citizenship education as an ethical position; a section on “conviviality” and “learning to live together” and a section on activities and strategies that can enhance a global citizenship perspective in schools. The report also provides a variety of resources to integrate global citizenship and indigenous perspectives in classrooms.
  • SCHIPPLING, A.. Researching global citizenship education: Towards acritical approach. Journal of Social Science EducationVol. 19, No. 4 (2020)DOI 10.4119/jsse-3466pp. 98-113¬†https://www.jsse.org/index.php/jsse/article/view/3466/4001
  • This article contains a reflection on researching in global citizenship educationwith a critical approach that aims to transcend the paradigm of methodological natio-nalism.
  • Starting from outlining different dimensions of globalcitizenship (education),¬†¬† and¬†¬† looking¬†¬† at¬†¬† the¬†¬† current¬†¬† research¬†¬† situation¬†¬† in¬†¬† GCE,¬†¬† wepropose a methodological turn that overcomes the nation-state paradigm as a base forcritical research on GCE. Subsequently, using the concept of transnational capital as ananalytical¬†¬† tool,¬†¬† we¬†¬† show¬†¬† ‚Äst¬† in¬†¬† the¬†¬† example¬†¬† of¬†¬† two¬†¬† biographical¬†¬† case¬†¬† studies¬†¬† in¬†¬† aninternational school in a large city of West Germany ‚Äď how to put a critical research onGCE into action.
  • The article¬†¬† demonstrates,¬†¬† on¬†¬† the¬†¬† one¬†¬† hand,¬†¬† how¬†¬† a¬†¬† critical¬†¬† approach¬†¬† toresearch aspects of global citizenship education can be taken, starting from a trans-national¬†¬† research¬†¬† ¬†¬† On¬†¬† the¬†¬† other¬†¬† hand,¬†¬† it¬†¬† presents¬†¬† new¬†¬† perspectives¬†¬† andchallenges for critical research in GCE.
  • STAR√Ā, Jana a Karel STAR√Ě. Qualitative case study: teaching citizenship through history education in primary schools.¬†Citizenship Teaching & Learning. 2019, 14(1), 87-105. ISSN 1751-1917.¬†https://intellectdiscover.com/content/journals/10.1386/ctl.14.1.87_1
  • This empirical study focuses on an instruction of key historic events of twentieth-century Czechoslovakia and how it is being introduced to third-grade pupils. First, the topic is briefly introduced using a theoretical framework of current development of history education in primary schools, and after a short description of the research methodology, the main findings are introduced. The qualitative explanatory case study of teaching performed by three teachers, which was based on various observations of their teaching, interviews with them and on an analysis of written tasks done by their pupils, has proven that primary school pupils are able to understand the meaning of historic events and the value of life in a free society. Teachers can guide their pupils towards this result using various approaches. However, it is important to respect the developmental abilities of pupils and to react to specific difficulties imposed by the subject matter of history education. These difficulties include demands on keeping track of time periods and the tendency towards personification and presentism. What has proven to be very efficient were the approaches of research-oriented instruction ¬Ė approaches using oral history and approaches based on the analysis of the value of living in a democratic society conducted on the basis of an interview about experiences and feelings with people who had lived during the times of oppression.
  • Stein, S., & Andreotti, V. (2021). Global citizenship otherwise. In Bosio, E. (2021).¬†Conversations on global citizenship education: perspectives on research, teaching, and learning in higher education. Routledge, p. 13-36.¬†https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429346897-2
  • This chapter presents an approach to ‚Äúeducating for global citizenship‚ÄĚ that the authors call global citizenship otherwise. This approach to global citizenship education (GCE) invites learners to decenter themselves, deepen their sense of responsibility, and disinvest from harmful desires so that we might learn to (co)exist differently on a shared planet. Global citizenship otherwise is partly inspired by decolonial, postcolonial, and indigenous critiques that denaturalize the harmful underside of the shiny promises offered by nation-states, global capital, universal knowledge, and separability, which we have summarized as the primary dimensions of the metaphorical ‚Äúhouse modernity built‚ÄĚ.
  • Stein, S., Andreotti, V., Ahenakew, C., SuŇ°a, R., Valley, W., Huni Kui, N., Trememb√©, M., Taylor, L., Siwek, D., Cardoso, C., Duque, C. ‘A. ‘, Oliveira da Silva Huni Kui, S., Calhoun, B., van Sluys, S., Amsler, S., D’emilia, D., Pigeau, D., Andreotti, B., Bowness, E., et al. (2023). Beyond colonial futurities in climate education.¬†Teaching in higher education,¬†28(5), 987-1004.¬†https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2023.2193667
  • Many pedagogies that seek to address the climate and nature emergency (CNE) promise hope and solutions for an idealized future. In this article, we suggest these pedagogies are rooted in the same modern/colonial system that created the CNE and other ‚Äėwicked‚Äô socio-ecological challenges in the first place, and thus they are not well-suited for preparing students to navigate these challenges. We also ask what kind of climate education could invite students to interrupt the reproduction of colonial futures, and deepen their sense of social and ecological responsibility in the present. As one possible response to this question, we offer an outline for¬†climate education otherwise, which seeks to prepare students with the stamina and the intellectual, affective, and relational capacities that could enable more justice-oriented coordinated responses to current and coming challenges.
  • Tarozzi, M. (2020). Role of NGOs in Global Citizenship Education, In¬†The Bloomsbury handbook of Global Education and Learning, edited by D. Bourn, 133-148.
  • Learning about global issues and themes has become an increasingly recognised element of education in many countries around the world. Terms such as global learning, global citizenship and global education can be seen within national education policies and international initiatives led by the UN, UNESCO, European Commission and OECD. The Bloomsbury Handbook of Global Education and Learning brings together the main elements of the debates, provides analysis of policies, and suggests new directions for research in these areas. Written by internationally renowned scholars from Brazil, Canada, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Pakistan, Poland, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, UK and the USA, the handbook offers a much needed resource for academics, researchers, policy-makers and practitioners who need a clear picture of global learning.
  • Tichnor-Wagner, A., Parkhouse, H., Glazier, J., & Cain, J. M. (2019).¬†Becoming a Globally Competent Teacher.
  • The responsibilities of the teacher have dramatically shifted over the past decade to include preparing students for a complex, interconnected world. On the one hand, teaching in an isolated classroom can feel like an espe cially local endeavor. Other than the occasional field trip or guest speaker, students may not be interacting with people and cultures beyond their class room walls. On the other hand, teachers are facing increasing pressures to prepare students for today‚Äôs global, knowledge-based economy. They also must effectively teach an increasingly diverse student population affected by real-world issues that have an impact on their physical and mental health and social-emotional well-being. The pushes and pulls teachers face as they seek to provide an equitable education to every student are multifaceted, and the responsibility to prepare students for a global world is rarely well defined.
  • State and federal education policies are increasingly pushing for high-qual ity standards aimed at effectively preparing students for college and careers in today‚Äôs rapidly shifting, global economy. An early goal of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS)‚ÄĒoriginally adopted by 46 states‚ÄĒwas to equip students ‚Äúwith the necessary knowledge and skills to be globally competi tive‚ÄĚ (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers, 2008, p. 6). Indeed, the mission statement of the U.S. Department of Education reads, ‚ÄúOur mission is to promote students‚Äô achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educa tional excellence and ensuring equal access‚ÄĚ (U.S. Department of Education, 2017).
  • At the same time, teachers‚Äô classrooms are becoming more global with growing numbers of students born outside the United States, and school demographics are becoming increasingly diverse, requiring teachers to adapt new strategies to effectively reach students whose racial, cultural, and lin guistic backgrounds may differ from their own. Approximately one in four students in the United States are first- or second-generation immigrants, 4.5 million are English language learners who speak one or more of 350 lan guages, and‚ÄĒas of 2016‚ÄĒa majority of children under the age of 5 are ethno racial minorities, signaling that the diversity in our schools is a long-term trend that is here to stay. At the same time, the U.S. teaching force does not reflect these demographic changes. In the 2015‚Äď2016 school year, 80 percent of teachers identified as white (Taie & Goldring, 2018).
  • Students are also living in what military and business leaders have dubbed a VUCA world‚ÄĒone that is volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. At the macro level, this includes unpredictable government elections, the rise of new political movements, shifts in international alliances, the advent of new technologies, and more. At the micro level, students are grasping with vola tility and uncertainty in immediate, personal ways: public health crises, such as the opioid epidemic and lead-contaminated water; a surge in hate crimes that target individuals‚Äô religion, race, or sexual identity; a constant barrage of school shootings; fears that parents or loved ones will get incarcerated or deported at any time.
  • Students cannot simply check the baggage they carry with them at the door. Research on the science of learning and development has repeatedly shown that physical and mental stress and trauma affect students‚Äô cogni tive development (Cantor, Osher, Berg, Steyer, & Rose, 2018). Unless society addresses the underlying causes that adversely affect students‚Äô physical and mental health, these undue impediments to learning will remain.
  • In this current landscape, what does a true vision of equitable teaching and learning look like? We argue that it is a comprehensive approach that addresses students‚Äô cognitive, social-emotional, and behavioral development. It is teaching that arms students with the knowledge and skillset to not merely survive but thrive in an ever-changing, interconnected world‚ÄĒone that both paves a pathway for students to pursue their passions and dreams and opens windows to opportunities students might not have known existed. It is teach ing that addresses the unique background each student brings and the insti tutional barriers students face on account of the racial, ethnic, cultural, or linguistic group with which they identify. It is teaching that provides students with the foundation to be the change they want to see in their own commu nities and the wider world.
  • This is not a utopic vision of teaching. Imagine a 1st grade classroom where English language learners in a semirural North Carolina community discuss the causes and effects of deforestation in the Amazon and articulate concrete actions they will take to protect the rainforest. Imagine 8th grade students in a town with a military base debate the pros and cons of the Viet nam War from the perspectives of both the Americans and the Vietnamese. Imagine 10th graders in Washington, DC and Ghana who collaborate across continents to discuss a lack of access to potable drinking water and devise STEM solutions to the problem. These are all realities. Teaching for global competence is one way that educators are already working toward this holis tic vision of education
  • UNESCO (2015). Global citizenship education: topics and learning objectives. 978-92-3-100102-4.¬†https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000232993
  • UNESCO has promoted global citizenship education since the launch of the UN Secretary-General‚Äôs Global Education First Initiative (GEFI) in 2012, which made fostering global citizenship one of its three education priorities.
  • This publication, titled Global Citizenship Education: Topics and learning objectives, is the first pedagogical guidance from UNESCO on global citizenship education. It is the result of an extensive research and consultation process with experts from different parts of the world. This guidance draws on the UNESCO publication Global Citizenship Education: Preparing learners for the challenges of the 21st century and the outcomes of three key UNESCO events on global citizenship education: the Technical Consultation on Global Citizenship Education (September 2013), as well as the First and Second UNESCO Fora on Global Citizenship Education, organized in December 2013 and January 2015 respectively. Before it was finalized, the guidance was field-tested by education stakeholders in selected countries in all regions to ensure its relevance in different geographical and socio-cultural contexts.
  • Following the foundational work of UNESCO to clarify the conceptual underpinnings of global citizenship education and provide policy and programmatic directions, this document has been developed in response to the needs of Member States for overall guidance on integrating global citizenship education in their education systems. It presents suggestions for translating global citizenship education concepts into practical and age-specific topics and learning objectives in a way that allows for adaptation to local contexts. It is intended as a resource for educators, curriculum developers, trainers as well as policy-makers, but it will also be useful for other education stakeholders working in non-formal and informal settings.
  • At a time when the international community is urged to define actions to promote peace, well-being, prosperity and sustainability, this new UNESCO document offers guidance to help Member States ensure that learners of all ages and backgrounds can develop into informed, critically literate, socially-connected, ethical and engaged global citizens. Qian Tang, Ph. D. Assistant Director-General for Education

 

  • United Nations. Act for our future¬† available from¬†https://www.un.org/en/actnow(accessed on¬†¬† 11/10¬† 2023)
  • Embrace the possible. That‚Äôs the call of the 17¬†Sustainable Development Goals, a blueprint for a better world. We don‚Äôt have to wait for the future we want‚ÄĒwe can create it right now. Everyone can join the global movement for change.
  • ActNow is the United Nations campaign to inspire people to act for the Sustainable Development Goals.
  • The Goals can improve life for all of us. Cleaner air. Safer cities. Equality. Better jobs. These issues matter to everyone. But progress is too slow. We have to act, urgently, to accelerate changes that add up to better lives on a healthier planet.
  • What happens when millions of people act together for our common future? A lot. Join the campaign to learn more‚ÄĒ and do more.
  • United Nations. Sustainable Development Goals available from¬†https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/student-resources(accessed¬† on 11/10¬†¬†2023 )
  • WELPLY, O. Global imaginaries: re-thinking possibilities for GCE. Zeitschrift f√ľr Internationale Bildungsforschung und Entwicklungsp√§dagogik [online]. 2019, 42(4), 27-33 [cit. 2020-11-29]. ISSN 14344688. doi:10.31244/zep.2019.04.05
  • Global Citizenship Education (GCE) is often seen as the best response to contemporary global humanitarian, social and political challenges. Yet despite this newfound popularity, GCE remains a contentious and widely debated concept. Critiques have stressed the abstract and elusive nature of the notion, its lack of concrete legal framework as well as its bias towards a Western, neoliberal and consumerist agenda, which is not devoid of colonial undertones. This paper seeks to address this latter tension by examining GCE through the lens of global imaginaries, which looks at imagination as a new social practice, capable of generating transformation and change. Building on the work of Paul Ricoeur, in particular the ideas of utopia, imagination and social imaginaries, this paper aims to offer new conceptualisations of GCE around the notion of global imaginaries, in an attempt to overcome the dichotomies that tend to underpin the concept.¬†
  • West, J. D., Jacquet, J., King, M. M., Correll, S. J., & Bergstrom, C. T. (2013). The role of gender in scholarly authorship.¬†PloS one,¬†8(7), e66212.¬†https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0066212
  • Gender disparities appear to be decreasing in academia according to a number of metrics, such as grant funding, hiring, acceptance at scholarly journals, and productivity, and it might be tempting to think that gender inequity will soon be a problem of the past. However, a large-scale analysis based on over eight million papers across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities reveals a number of understated and persistent ways in which gender inequities remain. For instance, even where raw publication counts seem to be equal between genders, close inspection reveals that, in certain fields, men predominate in the prestigious first and last author positions. Moreover, women are significantly underrepresented as authors of single-authored papers. Academics should be aware of the subtle ways that gender disparities can occur in scholarly authorship.
  • WOOD, B., TAYLOR, R., ATKINS, R., & JOHNSTON, M. (2018). Pedagogies for active citizenship: Learning through affective and cognitive domains for deeper democratic engagement. Teaching and Teacher Education, 75, 59 ‚Äď 267.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.07.007
  • This paper reports on a two-year study that explored teachers’ pedagogical approaches when implementing an active citizenship curriculum initiative in New Zealand. Our aim was to identify pedagogies which afforded potential for critical and transformative citizenship learning. We define critical and transformative¬†social actionthrough a fusion of critical pedagogy and Dewey’s notion of democratic education. Data included teachers’ classroom-based research as well as classroom observations and interviews with students. Our study suggested that citizenship learning through both affective and cognitive domains can provide for deeper opportunities for students to experience critical and transformative democratic engagement.
  • Yemini, M. (2021). Rethinking the sacred truths of global citizenship education: A theoretical exploration.¬†Prospects (Paris),¬†53(3-4), 173-179. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11125-021-09587-1
  • This article aims to unpack global citizenship education (GCE) as a concept, arguing that a certain moving forward is needed in the scholarship to allow true engagement of educators and thus students with the topic. It suggests that the contemporary research directions are entangled with strong trends of political correctness and a contrariness agenda, de facto nullifying school-based praxis. It also notes several assumptions in the GCE literature that may benefit from re-examination to critically engage with criticisms of GCE.
  • Yemini, M., Tibbitts, F., & Goren, H. (2019). Trends and caveats: Review of literature on global citizenship education in teacher training.¬†Teaching and teacher education,¬†77, 77 – 89.¬†https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.09.014
  • The recently growing incorporation of contents related to Global Citizenship Education (GCE) in education systems and teacher education worldwide (Bamber, Bullivant, Glover, King, & McCann, 2016; Gaudelli, 2016) has generated a vast body of empirical and theoretical scholarship (Goren and Yemini, 2017a). Often, the increasing prominence of GCE internationally is described as a response to economic, social, and political changes that have made countries more interconnected through enhanced international mobility and economic interdependency (Gaudelli, 2016). Globalization is claimed to lead to more diverse societies that require engagement with broader, more inclusive conceptions of citizenship (Banks, 2017; Davies et¬†al., 2018).
  • Within this scholarship, teacher education and the professional development of in-service teachers in the realm of GCE remains under-examined. Teachers may be the most influential agents of GCE, determining both the way and the extent to which it is implemented in classrooms (Goren and Yemini, 2016; Schweisfurth, 2006). Professional development programs aimed at fostering Global Citizenship (GC) among teachers and preparing them for teaching GCE have been shown to impact teachers’ predispositions towards and understanding of these fields (Appleyard & McLean, 2011). One comprehensive, systematic review was conducted in the field of GCE to date (Goren and Yemini, 2017a). That review, which qualitatively explored trends and caveats in the empirical literature concerning GCE, showed that studies related to teachers were unique in many ways and raised questions that differ from those covered by studies focused on students or policy. That review, alongside several other studies, alluded to teacher education and professional development as imperative in the dissemination and execution of GCE-related themes and policy within classrooms, pointing to the practical need to explore what is currently being done (and more specifically, researched) in this field. To address this gap, the present mixed-methods systematic review analyzes the academic literature on GCE and teacher education between 2006 and 2017 in a quest to understand how teacher education scholars are theorizing and researching the presence of GCE in teacher education programs.
  • The mapping of academic fields can be performed through various methods, but the main aim is common (Blumenfeld-Lieberthal, Serok, & Milner, 2017; √Ėz√ßńĪnar, 2015); namely, to locate catalysts, revolutions, and nuanced changes‚ÄĒparticularly over time‚ÄĒso as to inform future scholarship and practice. In the present review, we seek to influence the GCE field by identifying the evolution over time of the scholarship surrounding GCE within teacher education and providing an account of topics it most prominently encompasses, as well as those that have been overlooked.
  • We describe our methodology in the first section of this article. We carried out a mixed-methods analysis of the literature, applying both inductive and deductive approaches to discerning the presence of GCE-related topic in teacher-training research. Our quantitative analysis of 90 articles through the use of Open Calais (a Natural Language Processing [NLP] tool), followed by an inductive network analysis, revealed four clusters of topics in the GCE teacher-education literature: (1) Education Concepts; (2) Globalization and Culture; (3) Education for Environmental Sustainability; and (4) Language Learning. By breaking down our analysis into three time periods (2006‚Äď2009, 2010‚Äď2013, and 2015‚Äď2017), we detected further nuances in the quantitative and visual trends.
  • We then carried out a complementary qualitative content analysis with a subset of the articles that attested to pronounced themes in GCE as the intention was to shed light on both the common GCE frameworks that scholars use and the characteristics of GCE in teacher training and professional development as presented in the literature. Our analysis is rooted in adapted versions of two typologies: (1) we drew on teacher education program typologies developed by Evans, Stevenson, Lasen, Ferreira, and Davis (2017) in coding for programming approaches, program rationales, and pedagogical approaches; and (2) we relied on Oxley and Morris’ (2013) GCE typologies in reviewing the underlying rationales for GCE that scholars apply. We selected these theoretical frameworks because of their popularity in GCE research and their comprehensiveness.
  • We present our findings in the second section of our article. The analysis reveals how studies involving GCE and teacher training fit into existing categorizations of both typologies. Moreover, we show through network analysis how the topics discussed in the literature evolved over time, becoming more intricate and encompassing more distinct topics, such as education for sustainable development (ESD) and critical thinking.
  • We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for future research. Considering the rising interest in GCE and the importance of teacher education in its implementation, we argue that understanding the current research landscape could be useful for policymakers, educators, and scholars who seek to build upon the existing body of knowledge and to develop it in new directions.